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FAQ overview

Questions

LIFE STYLE
OWNERSHIP
TECHNICAL

Answers

Assembly:

Your scooter will arrive in a steel cage inside a cardboard box.

First remove the cardboard box. This is the easy part! Then you'll need to take apart the steel cage by removing all the nuts and bolts holding it together. At some point in the process you may need a second person to help you by holding the scooter upright while you remove the last few bolts and possibly the bailing wire used to secure the scooter to the base of the cage. Most of the scooters we carry already have both wheels attached, you can roll it out of the case and set it on the center stand.

Now you can look for "assembly instructions", which with the average imported scooter will be one sheet of paper which says something like "attach the rear view mirrors, install the battery, etc.". You may have to use some ingenuity to figure out how to do all this, but it shouldn't be beyond the capabilities of any amateur home mechanic. It may help if you have a decent socket set, screwdriver set and set of metric wrenches since the supplied "tool kit" usually leaves much to be desired.

Batteries are typically shipped "dry" with the acid in a separate container. You have to add the acid to the battery and leave it for 30 minutes of so before using it. After this it shouldn't need to be charged to start the scooter.

Once you have all the parts attached (and that will include at least mirrors, seat, rear carrier, battery and floor mats), and you've waited about 30 minutes after adding acid to the battery, you'll be ready to start the scooter.

If you just put fuel in the tank, you may have to crank it quite a few times before it starts since the fuel has to get to the carburetor and fill the float chamber before gas gets to the engine. You can prime the carburetor by disconnecting the fuel hose from the vacuum valve and connecting it directly to a small funnel and adding a little gas, then reconnecting the fuel line to the valve and adding fuel to the tank. However if you don't know what you're doing, just try to follow whatever instruction came with the scooter. Use premium gas. Most scooters seem to be setup to run on 91 octane fuel.

The final point of assembly is to check everything. Check the tire pressures, check that every bolt and nut you can see is tight, especially the ones holding the exhaust and muffler - and the wheels! Look around for lose wires or rubber hoses that don't seem to be attached to anything.

Please Note that by purchasing a JRM designated vehicle online, you are responsible for performing the setup that a dealer would normally perform - such as checking the tires, hooking up the battery, checking tightness of all nuts and bolts, changing oil, etc. Although we do provide some very good information and assembly manuals in our support section; occasionally some vehicles may need other routine items checked/adjusted such as adjusting the carburetor idle and mixture screws, checking to ensure wires are well connected, adjusting chain slack and alignment, if needed. Since you're skipping a dealer and saving over half the retail showroom price, you'll need to perform the final assembly yourself, or have it done by a professional mechanic if you do not feel comfortable about doing it yourself.   This will take generally 30-90 minutes to perform depending on your vehicle and skill level. While we will gladly assist you with any technical questions, we cannot refund or exchange your unit if you cannot perform these functions or refuse to let a shop do it for you.  By placing an order with JRM you agree to these terms and conditions upon making your purchase.    So if you would like a professional mechanic perform the easy set-up for you, for peace of mind, all you have to do is look in your local phone directory for a scooter, moped or motorcycle repair shop, sales or service center.   There is an abundance of these types of shops in every urban and suburban area and they are very easier to find.    This may sound strange, but you might also get some help from a snow mobile, water craft, and even a lawn mower repair shop, since these places are used to working on small engines.   You can also try snowmobile and ATV repair shops.  Certainly if you were able to find Joy Ride Motors online to purchase your vehicle, you are capable of locating a service shop on Google Local to assist you just as well.   However, if you are at a complete loss as to where to find one, then please call customer service at 1-877-300-8707 and we'll use our best efforts to assist you. 

Carburetor Adjustment:

If there's any one component that's more likely to go out of adjustment on your scooter, it's the carburetor. If it does go out of adjustment lots of things can happen. It can make the scooter hard to start, it can make the scooter slow to accelerate, it can cause the scooter to idle badly and stall or it can make the scooter idle fast so that it's trying to go all the time and needs the brake to hold it stationary. None of these things are good.

What the carburetor does is regulate the amount of fuel and air which are supplied to the engine. To go faster you need more fuel and more air and they must be in the right proportion. The fuel also has to be atomized as much as possible (i.e. be supplied in tiny droplets). The carburetor controls all these functions and generally does it quite well. Without removing and disassembling the carburetor, there are only two adjustments you can make, but these should take care of most minor problems. The first is the adjustment of the idle speed.

Scooter Carburetor Adjustment - Idle Speed

Above is a picture of a typical GY6 engine carburetor and the view is that from the right side of most engine configurations on 150cc Chinese scooters. There's a small spring loaded screw which adjusts the idle speed. It's right next to the throttle control which is connected to the twist grip on the right handlebar. On most 150cc scooters, idle speed should be around 1500rpm when the engine is fully warmed up. Don't make adjustments when the engine is cold. Take a 5 or 10 minute ride first. When the engine is cold the automatic choke is in operation and that can change the idle speed. If you have a tachometer, setting the speed is easy. If you don't, you want to set the speed to a low idle. Fast enough so that the engine doesn't stumble or stall, but slow enough that the clutch doesn't engage and try to move the scooter forward. On most scooters from 50cc to 250cc, this will be somewhere in the 1500-2000rpm region.

The other adjustment you can make is to the low speed fuel/air ("mixture") ratio. This is done on most scooters using a screw adjustment on the other side of the carburetor as shown below.


Scooter Carburetor Adjustment - Fuel/air Ratio

This screw changes the air to fuel ratio at low speeds. It shouldn't need much adjustment, but the way to do it is to turn the screw very slightly (1/8th turn) and see if the idle speed goes up or down. If it goes down, turn the screw back 1/8th turn to where it started, then 1/8 turn in the other direction and see if the idle speed goes up or down. If it goes down, turn it back to where you started since you didn't need any adjustment! If the idle speed goes up, continue turning the screw in 1/8th turn steps until the idle speed is at a maximum. If it starts to go down, turn it back to get the maximum idle speed.

You may need to go back to the idle speed screw to lower the idle speed if it's now too fast. So the basic procedure is to set the fuel/air mixture to give you the fastest idle, then use the idle speed adjustment to set the speed to the lowest rpm that gives you smooth running.

If the scooter idles well and runs fine at low speed, but has problems at high speed, the problem may lie inside the carburetor with the main jet. The fuel/air ratio at higher speeds is set by the jets inside the carburetor and to get at them the carburetor has to be removed and disassembled. This can be a tricky job as the parts are small and delicate. The good news is that these carburetors are quite cheap. You can get a new one for $60-$80, so if you can't make your scooter run smoothly and you don't like the idea of taking the carburetor apart, you can always replace it!

Does Joy Ride Motors manufacturer the gas powered vehicles it sells?

Joy Ride Motors does not directly import, nor do we manufacture, any of the gas powered vehicles sold on this site.   We are an online dealership, proudly offering only the very best and highest quality vehicles available in the online marketplace, presented under our proprietary designations.    We sources these vehicles from the most proven and established vendors who share the same commitment to quality and customer service as we do.  
 
Joy Rides on and off road product are selectively-sourced from the combined inventories of; BMS, Roketa, Ice Bear, Kandi, SSR, Sky Team, Excalibur, Road Rat, Snyder and Sunny Motorsports.    We also offer select products from; Sachs, Genuine Scooters aka Buddy 125cc, Piaggiao, Vespa, Lambretta, Kawasaki, Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha in their OEM versions.  
 
Our most popular sellers (under our own designations) are the; BMS Scooters, Roketa Scooters, Ice Bear ATV’s, Kandi Go Carts, SSR Dirt Bikes, SSR Pit Bikes, BMS Dune Buggies, Ice bear Trikes, Roketa ATV’s, Roketa UTV’s, BMS UTV’s, BMS ATV’s, BMS Trikes, Ice Bear UTV’s, Ice Bear Scooters, and other select products that have a proven track record for quality and performance.    We only offer the ‘top of the line’ versions of our vendors’ product lines, which are always upgrades from the (also available) base models and come mostly, if not completely assembled.    
 
Trust us... there are a lot of cheap scooters, cheap atv’s, and cheap dirt bikes out there to pick from.   Here you will only find inexpensive Scooters, inexpensive ATV’s and Inexpensive Dirt Bikes... that are NOT cheap quality... just astonishingly low priced.   WE ‘cherry pick’ only the very best models to offer you for the least expensive price available online.    So if you should see a Ice Bear UTV, or a BMS Dune Buggy, or a Roketa Trike on the manufacturers’ website, but not on Joy Rides... then there is a very good and valid reason – and has everything to do with your safety, and nothing to do with our bottom line.
 
You can visit the corporate websites of our top vendors at the links below.   However, you wont be able to make any retail transactions for these vehicles on any of these websites.    You can look... but you can not buy... so if you wish to purchase ... say a; BMS Scooter... or a Roketa Dirt Bike.... an SSR Pit Bike... an Ice bear ATV... or a Kandi Go Cart...  you must do so from Joy Rides directly.  
 
BMS           -  http://www.bmsmotor.com/
Roketa        -  http://www.roketa.com/index.shtml
Ice Bear      -  http://www.icebearatv.com/
Kandi         -   http://www.kandiusa.com/
SSR            -   http://www.ssrmotorsports.com/store/index.html
Sky Team   -   http://skyteamusa.com/Home_Page.php
Excalibur    -   http://www.atv4usa.com/
Road Rat    -   http://www.roadratmotors.com/
Snyder       -   http://www.wildfiremotors.com

Electric Start not working?

  • Make sure the squeeze the left handle brake while pressing the electric button.
  • When the electric start make clicking noise, it means your battery is weak
  • Check the fuse.
  • Is your key switch good?
  • Is the electric start giving out a burnt smell? You might have a burnt out electric start. However, sometimes there is no smell.


Help my scooter will not start:

To start a scooter needs three things:

  • Gas
  • A spark
  • Cylinder compression

If your scooter won't start it due to one of the above not being present. Before you start troubleshooting, make sure there is gas in the tank by actually looking into it. Don't just trust the gas gauge!

Most scooters have four things that need to be done before they can be started with the electric starter:

  • The ignition has to be turned on
  • The kill switch (usually near the right grip) has to be in the "on" position
  • The rear (left) brake lever has to be squeezed.
  • The starter button must be pressed.

Some scooters may have other interlocks on the front brake or the center stand. Check your owner's manual to make sure that you are doing all you need to?? complete the electrical circuit which enables it to start.

If the scooter doesn't turn over when you've done all the required operations, there's an electrical problem with the battery. Make sure the battery is charged. If it is, make sure the fuse hasn't blown. If it hasn't, check to see if you are getting voltage to the starter motor terminals. If you are, the starter motor is likely defective. Many scooters have a kick start (see your manual). If the battery is OK and the starter motor doesn't work, try kick starting it. It's usually not too hard. My scooter usually starts OK on the 2nd or 3rd kick.

If the scooter does turn over but still doesn't start you have to check for a spark and make sure gas is getting to the engine. To check for a spark, remove the spark plug from the cylinder, hold the tip of the plug against the cylinder head and crank the engine. You should see a spark across the gap. If you don't, there's a problem with the ignition. Could be a faulty coil or electronic ignition module which will have to be replaced, or it could just be a lose wire.

If you do have a spark, you need to check the gas. Make sure there is gas in the tank first! If there is you need to check the fuel valve. Most scooters use a gravity fuel feed by locating the fuel tank higher than the carburetor. The fuel usually then flows through filter and then through a vacuum operated valve. The valve has three hoses connected to it. One if from the fuel tank and is for the gas going in, one is connected to the carburetor and is for the gas coming out and one goes to the engine manifold which provides a vacuum. If you disconnect the hose from the carburetor, fuel should run out when you crank the engine (be careful to catch the gas if you do this and don't do it with a hot engine). If you don't see gas the fuel valve may be faulty. You can try applying a vacuum to the control port of the valve and see if the fuel flows. Sucking on the line is one way to do this (but make sure it's the vacuum line, not the gas line if you try this!).

If you are getting a spark and you are getting gas to the carburetor and the engine is turning over on the starter OK, it's possible that the electrically operated automatic choke has failed. It's supposed to operate when the engine is cold, but if it's stuck or burned out, the mixture will be weak and the scooter probably won't start. The automatic choke is usually a black cylindrical object attached to the carburetor with a couple of wires coming out of it as shown on the left. It's the only electrical powered component attached to the carburetor, so it's usually not hard to spot. If you have a voltmeter you can measure the resistance across the leads of the choke. It should be somewhere in the region of around 10 or 20 ohms. If it's an open circuit, it's burned out and will need to be replaced. If it seems to be OK it may be stuck, or the wiring to it may have a problem. Check to see that it's getting voltage.

It's also possible that there is a problem with the carburetor and if so you may need to remove it and clean it out. If the scooter has been sitting for a few months with gas in the carburetor, the gas may have evaporated and left a sticky "gum" behind that will prevent the carburetor from working properly and which must be removed.

If the automatic choke is OK, the starter cranks the engine, there's gas and there's a spark then there may be an engine problem. You need to check the cylinder compression. You need a compression tester to do this. It screws in instead of the spark plug and measures cylinder pressure. When you crank the engine you should see a reading of around 150 psi or more. If it's 100 psi or less there's likely and engine problem (bad valve, bad piston, failed piston rings) which will need the engine taken apart to find.
Probably the most common problems are a dead battery or carburetor problems due to bad adjustment or build up of gummy deposits. Carburetor problems usually come on slowly though. If a scooter is OK one day and refuses to start the next day, I'd first suspect an electrical problem.

How Much does a Scooter Cost?

Japanese and Italian scooters which are sold through authorized dealers, the price goes up significantly. For a 50cc scooter expect to pay around $3300 for something like a Vespa LX 50, which is a "classic" small scooter or something like $3000 for an Aprilia SR50 (fuel injected two-stroke) which is a little more sleek and modern looking. The classic Honda Metropolitan 50cc sells for around $2000.

Going up to a 250cc, for something like an Aprilia SportCity 250 expect to pay around $4600, or $5400 for a Honda Helix. If you go to larger scooters like the Honda Siver Wing (580cc) you'll pay $8100 ($8600 with true APS braking). The 400cc Yamaha Majesty sells for around $6100 and the Suzuki Bergman 650 will cost you $9000.
How fast do Scooters go?

Small 50cc scooters ("Mopeds") are good for about 30 mph, maybe 35 mph in some states without speed restrictions. They will just about keep up with urban traffic, but you have to ride them WOT (Wide Open Throttle) do to that. This can be good for novices and young riders because in most of states the rider does not need a motorcycle license to operate a 50cc less scooter, but the inability to keep up with faster traffic can sometimes be a hazard as cars try to "squeeze" past you when there really isn't room.

150cc Chinese scooter. It might look fast, but it's not really very happy above 60 mph. Mid sized 150cc scooters are good for 55-65 mph, though with a long enough run at it they may get up to 65+mph, especially if there's a tail wind or slight downhill grade. 45-50mph is enough to keep up with most urban and suburban traffic, though it's really not enough to flow with the traffic on a freeway, where speeds of 65-75mph are more normal. We'd certainly recommend a 150cc scooter over a 50cc scooter for commuting unless you live in Manhattan. Most of the 150cc scooters cruise quite comfortably at 45-50mph.

If you want a high speed machine, you would probably be better off with a motorcycle.? 250cc scooters are just about OK for freeway use and should be able to cruise at 60mph and get up to speeds of 70mph or more if pushed. We wouldn't recommend riding anything less than a 250cc scooter on the freeway, you might want to check out the motorcycles that are listed on our website.

Maintenance:

Scooter maintenance is pretty important. It's even more important than on a car because the engine has to work harder and component failure can more easily lead to loss of control.

Perhaps the most important and easiest item of maintenance is to regularly check the oil level and change the oil at frequent intervals. We suggest changing the oil at least every 1000 miles is a good idea. The oil capacity is less than 1 liter and so an oil change costs about $3 and takes about 5 minutes. It's cheap insurance to keep your engine running for as long as possible. Most of the manual recommends changing the transmission oil every 2000 miles or 6 months. Since it only takes about 100ml of oil (which costs under $1) and takes a couple of minutes to do, don't skimp on transmission oil changes. We recommend using Castrol 10-30W engine oil and Castrol 80/90 transmission gear oil. Which oil you use is less important than how often you change it, though you probably should avoid using pure synthetic oil in a scooter, especially during the break in period. Once you have several thousand miles on the engine, a synthetic blend may be OK, but you should still change the oil regularly.

Checking tire pressure regularly is also very important. Unlike a car, a scooter only has two wheels and tire problems can lead more easily to a loss of control and possible injury, so making sure your tire pressures are correct makes sense.

Though a standard maintenance schedule calls for checking bolt tightness every 1000 miles or 6 months, it certainly doesn't hurt to do it more frequently.

Every 250 miles or every month:

  • Check engine oil level
  • Check tire pressure
  • Check lights and horn
  • Check battery level

Every 1000 miles or every 6 months

  • Change engine oil
  • Check tires for wear
  • Check valve stems for splits or cracks
  • Check brakes and throttle operation. Lubricate cables if required
  • Check all screws nuts and bolts and tighten. Especially check muffler and exhaust fasteners and front and rear axles

Every 2000 miles or every year

  • Change the transmission oil
  • Check and adjust valve clearance
  • Clean air cleaner
  • Check and clean (or replace) spark plug
  • Check brake linings.
  • Check/clean/lubricate brake and throttle cables.
  • Check CVT drive belt for wear and cracks
  • Check wheel and steering bearings

Though not exactly maintenance, We'd recommend carrying a basic tool kit at all times. That would include the following items:

  • 3/8" drive metric socket set
  • Flat blade and Phillips head screwdrivers
  • Roll of electrical tape
  • Roll of duct tape
  • Pair of pliers
  • Pair or wire cutters
  • Flashlight (LED type for long battery life)
  • Short length of wire
  • Set of metric wrenches
  • Short length of fuel/vacuum hose
  • Spark plug wrench and spare spark plug
  • A few nylon cable ties

My engine froze...

The cause is lack of oil getting to the piston and needle bearing areas. Certain oil can't cling on when the engine get too hot. As a result, the needle bearing fell apart inside and caused the engine to cease. You can buy a new a engine or try to rebuild it.? Be sure to always maintain proper engine oil levels to help prevent this from happening.

Registration:

Now that you've bought a scooter through our website you'll have some work to do. In most of the states you'll need a manufacturer's statement of origin (MSO), which the dealer should provide. This is a certificate from the scooter manufacturer which has the make, model and VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) on it and is proof that the scooter meets all applicable DOT and EPA standards for registration in the USA, and in particular for the state you are trying to register it in. You also need proof of insurance, the dealer invoice and a valid driver's license. Then you simply drive to your local DMV office, wait in line for 20 minutes, get the forms, fill them out, wait in line for another 30 minutes and if all your documents are in order you get a title and your motorcycle plates (moped plates if your scooter is under 50cc).

Then you have to take your scooter to an inspection station along with a yellow card which the DMV office provided, proof of insurance and a valid drivers license (with motorcycle endorsement if the scooter is over 50cc) and the inspection station will give you an inspection sticker good for 4 years. They may also check that your helmet meets local requirements (DOT certification etc).

It is very simple to title and register your new moped, scooter or motorcycle. When buying a scooter online, you should expect to receive the following documents:

  • A Certificate of Origin (MCO), a.k.a. MSO (Manufacturer Statement of Origin.)
  • A Bill of Sale.

The certificate of origin is an official title document that releases the scooter from the importer to the dealer. The dealer released the scooter to you. All documents for every street legal vehicle are usually sent in the mail 2 to 4 days after the scooter is shipped. Please note, we do not mail your MSO and Bill of Sales alone with your scooter, there is a possibility of receiving your registration information before you even receive your vehicle, since the trucking company usually has longer transit time frame compares to first class mail service. We request each customer to confirm your VIN by email if you don't receive your registration documentations 7 business days after receiving your street legal scooter or motorcycle. To confirm: simply send an email to sales@joyridemotors.com include your order number and VIN in the subject or the body. We will have one of our professional title representatives to process your title request immediately. MSO request generally requires 3-5 business days to process, and it is FREE of charge!

Vehicle Identification Number is usually located on the front of the steering stem or at the bottom of the floor mat, where you would place your foot. The VIN number consists of a 17 digit alpha numeric number, and usually has the engine number located on the same plate. The plated steel mount can be either black or steel.

Each MSO Title certificate will be accompanied by a Bill of Sale and Invoice for registration purposes. If your state requires your MSO to be notarized, please indicate on your MSO request form. There is a $25.00 fee for each notary. We offer overnight service for an additional $55.00. Please note: overnight service only guarantees we mail your documents via overnight service. We do not guarantee your MSO will be prepared and processed overnight. There is $20.00 fee for each replacement MSO.

Once you receive these documents, you need to take them with your scooter or motorcycle to your local DMV (Department of Motor Vehicle). They will inspect the bike and compare the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) on the paperwork to the one on the scooter. They will inspect the vehicle as well.

Your DMV will collect the sales tax as well as any applicable registration fee and will issue a license plate for your vehicle.

Repairing your Scooter

So you buy a scooter and something breaks. Who is going to fix it?  We have a few suggestions for you. You can try contacting local motorcycle (or better still, scooter) repair shops.   If your favorite mechanic is not very enthusiastic about working on an imported scooter, because they think they will have a difficulty getting replacement parts, then they can call us so we can assist them in locating the right part(s).   Replacement parts are easy to order and we are happy to assist, and even though we cannot guarantee availability at any given time, we will use our best efforts to help you or your mechanic locate the parts or the resources needed to attain them.

The best way to avoid needing repairs is regular maintenance, which means changing the oil regularly, changing the fuel filter and spark plug at the proper intervals, checking the CVT belt and air filter, checking the tires and going around the scooter at least once a month and making sure that all the bolts are tight (especially the bolts holding the muffler on). Use the recommended grade of gas (usually higher than 90 octane for most Chinese scooters) and add fuel stabilizer if the scooter isn't going to be driven for a while.

If you consider yourself a mechanically competent person, then It's not a bad idea to keep a few spare parts (such as a spare spark plug and CVT belt) on hand, just in case you need them.   Even though we do not recommend you do this yourself unless you are a real mechanic, It's a good idea to remove the CVT cover on your new scooter and read the number on the belt BEFORE you need to change it. Belt sizes vary, even on identical scooter models.   By the time the belt fails, the size markings may have worn off, and then it becomes a guessing game.   The belt size is usually three numbers such as "835-20-30". This would mean the belt is 835mm long, 20mm wide and has a cross section with a 30 degree bevel angle.

Though you won't find individual repair manuals for every different scooter, they are all pretty similar and many use the same engines and transmission parts.   Most scooters are OEM (Other Equipment Makers) and compatible with brand name manufacturers such as Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha.     There are a couple of books which may help. The Haynes guide is probably the best general reference for the repair of "generic" scooter.   The "Complete Idiot's Guide to Motor Scooters" is pretty basic and really doesn't give much detailed information, though it's not a bad introduction to scooters if you really know nothing at all about them.   Certainly you can find all sorts of different reference manuals and guides on Amazon if you are so inclined.  

Please Note that by purchasing a JRM designated vehicle online, you are responsible for performing the setup that a dealer would normally perform - such as checking the tires, hooking up the battery, checking tightness of all nuts and bolts, changing oil, etc. Although we do provide some very good information and assembly manuals in our support section; occasionally some vehicles may need other routine items checked/adjusted such as adjusting the carburetor idle and mixture screws, checking to ensure wires are well connected, adjusting chain slack and alignment, if needed. Since you're skipping a dealer and saving over half the retail showroom price, you'll need to perform the final assembly yourself, or have it done by a professional mechanic if you do not feel comfortable about doing it yourself.   This will take generally 30-90 minutes to perform depending on your vehicle and skill level. While we will gladly assist you with any technical questions, we cannot refund or exchange your unit if you cannot perform these functions or refuse to let a shop do it for you.  By placing an order with JRM you agree to these terms and conditions upon making your purchase.    So if you would like a professional mechanic perform the easy set-up for you, for peace of mind, all you have to do is look in your local phone directory for a scooter, moped or motorcycle repair shop, sales or service center.   There is an abundance of these types of shops in every urban and suburban area and they are very easier to find.    This may sound strange, but you might also get some help from a snow mobile, water craft, and even a lawn mower repair shop, since these places are used to working on small engines.   You can also try snowmobile and ATV repair shops.  Certainly if you were able to find Joy Ride Motors online to purchase your vehicle, you are capable of locating a service shop on Google Local to assist you just as well.   However, if you are at a complete loss as to where to find one, then please call customer service at 1-877-300-8707 and we'll use our best efforts to assist you. 

Oil Change:

What we are going to describe is how to change the engine and transmission oil in a 150cc Chinese scooter with a 4 stroke engine. The procedure should be pretty similar on 50cc and 250cc models with 4 stroke engines. 2 stroke engines mix gas and oil and so have no engine oil to be changed.

We'd recommend changing the engine oil at least every 1000 miles, and the transmission oil at least every 2000 miles. Regular oil changes are the easiest and cheapest way to maximize the life of your engine. Scooters take so little oil that it should cost less than $5 to do and once you know how to do it, it should take you more than 10-15 minutes. It's time and money well spent.

The first thing to do is to warm up the engine. Run it for a few minutes so that the oil is warm. That way it will flow easier. If you run it until the engine is hot, or you change the oil after you come back from a trip, that's OK, but you run the risk of burning yourself on the exhaust or with the hot oil. Be careful.

Find some level ground and put the scooter on its center stand. If the ground isn't level you won't get an accurate reading of the oil level when you put the new oil in. To change the engine oil you'll need a wrench to remove the oil drain plus, a flat dish container with a capacity of about 1/2 gallon and a funnel. First remove the "dipstick" which you use to check your oil. We'd also recommend you wear rubber gloves, or at least on? the hand you use to remove the oil drain plus. On most scooters there is a spring which will push the plug out when you have fully unscrewed it and oil will pour out of the drain hole, all over your hand. It's just messy if the oil is cool or warm, but if the oil is really hot it will burn your hand. So wear a glove to be safe.


Put the container for the used oil below the drain plus, loosen it with a wrench and then slowly unscrew it by hand. As it comes lose, the spring will push it down, so be prepared for that. You may drop the spring and a small wire mesh filter into the draining oil, but that's OK, you can fish them out later! Give the oil a minute or two to drain out. Make sure the filter is clean and then put the filter, spring and drain plug back. The spring sits on the plug and the filter sits on top of the spring with the mesh basket inside the spring.


You'll have to compress the spring to start the drain plus screwing into the engine, but once it does start, tighten it up by hand to make sure it's not cross-threaded. If it screws in easily, it's OK. If it doesn't want to tighten, you've probably cross threaded it, so try again. Finally tighten it up with a wrench. It should be tight, but don't over tighten it. The seal is made with a rubber "O" ring. You just need to tighten it enough so that it doesn't vibrate lose (which would be a disaster since all your oil would drain and the engine would seize!). The recommended torque on the drain plug is 1.4 kg.m (about 10 ft.lb)

Now you can add the new oil. It goes into the same hole as the "dipstick" fits in. You'll almost certainly need a small funnel to get oil into the filler hole without spilling it. Check your user manual for the recommended oil type, but on most Chinese 4 stroke scooters, regular 10-30W or 15-40W engine oil is used. You can use Castrol GTX 10-30W. You can get a 5 quart bottle for around $12 (try WalMart) which is good for at least 5 oil changes on a 150cc scooter. You can also use a synthetic oil blend if you wish, though pure synthetic oil isn't usually recommended. On a 150cc scooter you'll need about 0.8-0.9 liters which is just under 1qt. As you add the oil, check the level with the dipstick from time to time and fill to the recommended level. When you have the right level, screw the dipstick back in and you're done!

 

Changing the transmission oil is also very simple. Most scooters recommend changing the oil at least every 2000 miles. At the rear of the CVT on the left side of the bike there are drain and fill plugs for the transmission. Place the oil drain container under the drain plug. Now remove the filler plus first, then the drain plug and about 100 to 200cc of oil will drain out. There should be a sealing washer between the drain plus and the transmission casing. Make sure it's there and then screw the drain plug back into the transmission case. To refill the transmission, you squirt oil into the fill hole until it runs back out. That's your level check! Use the recommended oil, which in most cases is 80W-90 gear oil (though a few bikes may recommend using engine oil). To get it into the small hole you can use a small funnel and a short length of small diameter rubber hose. All you need is something to squirt 100-200cc of oil into the hole. You may be able to buy the oil in a plastic bottle with a long plastic tip, which you can use to directly squirt oil to the transmission fill hole. When it starts to run back out, it's full and you can replace the fill plug (note that it too should have a thin aluminum sealing washer).

Now run the engine for a minute or two, then check the oil level and add more if necessary. Check for any leakage around the drain plugs. If all looks OK, you're done for another 1000 miles.

Problems at higher speeds:

If the scooter idles well and runs fine at low speed, but has problems at high speed, the problem may lie inside the carburetor with the main jet. The fuel/air ratio at higher speeds is set by the jets inside the carburetor and to get at them the carburetor has to be removed and disassembled. This can be a tricky job as the parts are small and delicate. The good news is that these carburetors are quite cheap. You can get a new one for $60-$80, so if you can't make your scooter run smoothly and you don't like the idea of taking the carburetor apart, you can always replace it!

Hard to start?

  • Is the spark plug dirty? Clean or replace it if its dirty
  • Make sure the carburetor and the intake manifold are tightly secured to the engine.
  • Check the gasket between the carburetor and intake manifold. Sometimes the gasket is bad and caused leak. Solution: replace new gasket or just toss the bad gasket away and screw carburetor back. Try to start again.

If your vehicle is not charging:

  • Make sure the fuse in scooter is good.
  • Check the wires behind the fuse holder and the charging jack. Sometimes they come loose.

Battery not holding its charge:

  • Using the headlight, electric start and alarm (if applicable) too much will drain the battery.
  • Gas scooter does have the ability to charge itself but slowly. An optional charger can be for $25 at any local automotive stores.
  • Most new scooters would have a full charge and it would be display on the battery gauge. But in time, the batteries would loose their ability to hold a full charge. That's normal!
  • Sometimes charging the batteries too much even when they are not low. Most of these batteries charging cycle are around 250-300 times.
  • Sometimes store your scooter away for a long period would cause that as well. If the battery power drops beyond a certain point, the charger would not recognize it. Sometimes you could jump start the batteries by using a higher Amp charger.


Are you loosing power or is your engine bogging out?

  • Adjust the screw with the spring on the side of the carburetor. Clockwise to reduce gas flow and counterclockwise to allow more gas follow. Usually bogged down is caused too much gas going thru the carburetor.
  • Give time for it to warm up.
  • If that does not solve the problem, you need a new carburetor.